Thursday, December 17, 2015

Court Practice or Corporate Jobs....



Law students seem to be having a gradual change of mind and heart, which is good given the shortage of lawyers in the country. Students are slowly realizing that litigation is more gratifying both personally and professionally.

Bruinda Rao (28) graduated from the premier National Law School of India University in 2011 and bagged a job with a reputed law firm in Bengaluru. A year later, she made it to the prestigious Oxford University to pursue civil law. Bruinda came back in 2013 to take up litigation, and now practises at the Karnataka high court. "I have a greater sense of satisfaction today, much more than I got from a fat paycheque," she said.


Bruinda represents the new tribe of law students who take the corporate plunge after getting their law degrees but are quick to get back to their passion — litigation.

NLSIU vice-chancellor Prof R Venkata Rao said: "There is a belief that brilliant students choose lucrative corporate jobs over litigation. Five years ago, this was the truth but today the scenario has changed. Now, psychological satisfaction takes precedence over monitory bliss. Earlier, in a given batch of 75 students, the majority opted for corporate jobs. Today, at least 25 pick careers in litigation, join NGOs or human rights groups."

Last year, five of NLSIU alumnus were designated as senior judges at the district court as well as the high court. The public prosecutor in the Nirbhaya case is also an NLSIU alumnus, Rao stated.

Echoing Prof Rao's views, Sajan Poovayya, senior advocate at the Supreme Court and former additonal advocate general of Karnataka said: "The trend seems to have changed as compared to 20 years ago. But even today, corporate jobs are preferred over litigation. However, law students seem to be having a gradual change of mind and heart, which is good given the shortage of lawyers in the country. Students are slowly realizing that litigation is more gratifying both personally and professionally. The payscales in ligitation may not match those in the corporate sector, but the satisfaction one gets is something that money can't buy.''

At University Law College, more than 80% of the students go in for litigation, out of which over 40% are from a rural background. "We encourage our students to opt for litigation as there is a dearth of good advocates. Former Chief Justice of India MN Rao Venkatachaliah and former Justice of the Supreme Court are students of University Law College. While the salaries and the struggle period may deter some from pursuing litigation, those who are passionate about it go ahead nevertheless,"said Dr Suresh V Nadagoudar, principal.

Experts believe that paycales have improved in litigation. "Our college witnesses an equal number of students opting for litigation and corporate jobs. While those into co-curricular activities join the corporate sector, those who have connections in litigation often choose the bar," said prof Sreenidhi KR from CMR Law School.

TAKING HEADS

"Almost 60% of our students pursue careers in litigation, 20% join corporate firms and the remaining opt for higher education in foreign universities. But those who land corporate offers seem to get bored within 2-3 years. This is mainly because of job and psychological dissatisfaction." - A G Asha, principal, Seshadripuram Law College

"Students with a lawyer in the family or contacts in litigation find it easier to establish their careers while others may have to struggle. But today, we are seeing almost the same number of students opting for corporate jobs and and litigation." - Dr Seema Surendran, principal, BMS College of Law

"While most students choose corporate jobs, we also have an increasing number of girls interested in litigation, especially when it comes to anti-human trafficking. We also get some prominent lawyers to talk to students about litigation being a prospective career path." - AP Porkodi, Principal, Bishop Cotton Women's Christian Law College.




Source -Times of India

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